Servant Leaders and Global Citizenship

global citizenship

The success of big business and the well-being of the world have never been more closely linked. Global issues cannot be removed from the business world because business has only one world in which to operate. Businesses cannot succeed in societies that fail.”                                                     ~Jorma Ollila, Chairman and CEO, Nokia

Stephen Covey (Stephen R. Covey’s son) reviews the idea of global citizenship in his book, The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything. Servant leaders understand that global citizenship is an individual choice and that it is about you and me making a conscious decision to value and always to consider the well-being of others.

Global Citizenship is about caring for others in every dimension of our lives. Covey mentions Gandhi’s well- known quote, “One man cannot do right in one department of life whilst he is occupied in doing wrong in another department.”

Indeed, life is one indivisible whole. It is inconsistent to provide great customer service while at work and then to ignore the homeless person or neighbor in need who lives on your block. In doing so, unfortunately, we compartmentalize our lives, and this ultimately makes us feel fragmented and feel like we are living meaningless lives.

When we look at the 4 Cores from three perspectives, we can ponder on the following questions as it relates our self, our family, and or organizations:

Self

  1. Am I credible?
  2. Do I have Intent to do good?
  3. Do I contribute to the world selflessly?
  4. Am I a person that society can trust?

Family

  1. Do I exercise the leadership in my family that inspires and helps family members to become good global citizens?
  2. Do I set the example?
  3. Am I a food citizen within my own family as well as in the world?
  4. Do I align family structures and systems in a way that supports citizenship in the family and the world?
  5. Am I teaching my children global citizenship?

Organization

  1. Is our organization credible?
  2. Do we have integrity, and do we model that behavior?
  3. Do we demonstrate Intent to do good?
  4. Do we have the Capabilities to make a difference?
  5. Do we produce Results for shareholders and stakeholders?
  6. Do we give to society an organization they can trust?
  7. Does my leadership inspire others to become global citizens?
  8. Do we promote citizenship within the organization and also in the world?

For sure, Servant leaders realize that from the first wave (self-trust) trust to the fifth wave (societal trust), trust flows outward in our relationships, in our organizations, and into the greater world community.

There are 4 essential themes that emerge from Covey’s book. Servant leaders are smart when they decide to incorporate them into daily living.

A Summary

  1. The 4 Cores and 13 Behaviors are the tools that will create and restore trust on every level (the 5 waves of trust).
  2. The main principles of Organizational Trust are alignment. That is, making sure that systemic structures and processes within the organizations align with the 4 Cores and 13 Behaviors. This builds trust with the internal stakeholders.
  3. The main principles of establishing Market Trust is reputation or brand. The 4 Cores and 13 Behaviors inspire trust with external stakeholders to the extent that they will invest, recommend, and/or buy your products and services.
  4. The main principles of establishing Societal Trust is contribution. This principle is about the intent to give back and to become responsible global citizens.

These concepts are easy to digest intellectually. However, they are a little more challenging in real world situations. Servant Leaders must look for ways to apply these concepts on an experiential level and to teach them at work and at home.

Not only will Servant leaders better understand and realize the power of the 4 Cores and 13 Behaviors, but we will be amazed at the results when you operate at the speed of trust.

To Global Citizenship,

Dr. Crystal